Bible Discussion — Exodus 27-30

August 1, 2007, 12:00 pm; posted by
Filed under Bible, Chloe, David, Steve  | No Comments

This week, Bweinh.com looks at the next four chapters of the Bible, Exodus 27-30.

Previously in Exodus: 1-4 | 5-8 | 9-11 | 12-14 | 15-18 | 19-22 | 23-26

The book of Genesis:
1-4 | 5-9 | 10-14 | 15-18-2 | 19-22 | 23-26 | 27-29
30-32 | 33-36 | 37-39 | 40-43 | 44-46 | 47-50

 
INTRODUCTION:
David:
In these chapters God began to lay the foundation for atonement and introduced the function of the High Priest. Both of these are fulfilled in Jesus — the Lamb that was slain before the foundation of the world, and our High Priest.

 
SOMETHING YOU’D NEVER NOTICED BEFORE:
Steve:
Apparently the design of the altar and tabernacle were shown to Moses and some others up on the mountain.

Chloe:
30:15 talks about the “atonement for your lives,” as if to say that simply living requires forgiveness.

David:
The age-old question of briefs or boxers is settled in 28:42. Briefs don’t reach to the thigh.

 
BEST BAND NAME FROM THE PASSAGE:
Steve: Strange Incense
David: Curious Girdle
Chloe: Skillfully Woven Wasteband, Fat Tail

 
STORY IT REMINDS YOU OF:
Chloe:
Exodus devotes a lot of space to Aaron’s clothing for his priestly duties. Reading through it reminded me of both the armor of God and also how we as Christians should be set apart. There would be no mistaking Aaron in his outfit, made of the finest material woven by the finest craftsmen, and inlaid with filigree and jewels, carved with the names of the twelve sons of Israel. In the same way, we should also be unmistakable in our armor.

David:
As young Christians, David Maxon and I were wondering aloud about recreating the anointing oil with the printed recipe — until we read the part about being “cut off” for even attempting it.

Steve:
It reminds me of the schematics and diagrams necessary to construct a building, like our new church. And just like I have a hard time making sense out of the small words and endless lines there, here I find my mind wandering away from the tenths of ephahs and fat of rams.

 
DEEP THEOLOGICAL MEANING:
David:
God’s heart was always to reconcile us. The picture here is of sacrifice and offerings through the priesthood, but David knew God did not truly desire these, but rather a “broken and contrite heart.”

Steve:
In all of these rules, regulations and procedures, there is the underlying theme of sanctification. These things were specially constructed because they were to be forever devoted to God, and no one was allowed to use them for private purposes. And for a nation much like our own, prone to wander and forget, such blatant reminders built into the very construction of the town’s center were both necessary and helpful — although not foolproof.

Chloe:
There’s a huge debate these days about the way churches spend money. Some churches build enormous structures, complete with state-of-the-art equipment, coffee shops and bookstores. Others make do with a warehouse or an old storefront, while they send all their money overseas for missions or contribute to the higher power that is the church hierarchy. I’ve been in the camp that scorns the expensive equipment and attention-getting architecture for a while now, but reading the chapters in Exodus that paint so clear a picture of the tabernacle’s utter splendor made me think twice about my position. God deserves that kind of magnificence. However, the temple was to glorify God, and no one went hungry in the process (the tithes and offerings fed both the priests and the widows/orphans). So Exodus has brought me to the conclusion that a fantastic church building isn’t inappropriate as long as the congregation hasn’t lost sight of the goal — love the Lord your God and love your neighbor as yourself.

 
RANDOM THOUGHT:
Steve:
Where did the nomad Israelites get all that gold to begin with? Was it easier to find in ancient times? How much was it worth in today’s dollars?

Chloe:
God commanded that each time a census was taken, a ransom of half a shekel for a person had to be paid. Half a shekel is a fifth of an ounce. The small amount could either be so that even the poor could afford it, or to remind the people how little they were worth.

 
WHERE IS JESUS IN THIS PASSAGE:
David:
29:14 — “Without the camp…”

Hebrews says, “We have an altar, whereof they have no right to eat who serve the tabernacle. For the bodies of those beasts whose blood is brought in to the sanctuary by the high priest for sin are burned without the camp. Wherefore Jesus also, that he might sanctify the people with his own blood, suffered without the gate. Let us go forth therefore unto him bearing his reproach. For here we have no continuing city, but we seek one to come.”

Religion is beautiful, clean and honorable. Throwing in your lot with Jesus is not.

 
VERSE TO REMEMBER:
David:
30:15 — “The rich shall not give more and poor shall not give less…when they give an offering…for making atonement for their souls.”

Steve:
29:45 — “I will dwell among the children of Israel and will be their God.”

 
PORTION YOU WOULD MOST LIKE EXPLAINED IN HEAVEN:
David:
The curious girdle of the ephod. I just want to see it. I’m curious.

Chloe:
What happened to those who wouldn’t pay the ransom of half a shekel, or simply couldn’t afford it?

Steve:
I’d like to see the tabernacle with accoutrements, and get the full explanation of its significance and meaning from its original Designer.

 
LESSON TO TAKE AWAY:
Steve:
If we really consider these instructions, their significance to the people, and their description as eternal commandments, it should fill us with gratitude for the sacrifice of Christ that freed us from the law and its judgment.

David:
They placed anointing oil on the ear, thumb and big toe of the priests. Everything we hear, put our hand to, or walk in should be holy.

 
GENERAL RESPONSE TO THE PASSAGE:
David:
Now that the sacrifices and priesthood are gone it becomes so much easier. All you have to do is “…present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service..”

 
CONCLUSION:
Steve:
Next week’s passage has some interesting narrative, so I shall demand better participation!

David:
Aaron bore his brethren on his shoulders and on his heart before the Lord. As a nation of priests, can we do less?


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