Bible Discussion — Luke 19

April 23, 2008, 1:00 pm; posted by
Filed under Bible, Chloe, David, Josh J, Steve  | No Comments

This week, Bweinh.com looks at the next chapter of Luke, Luke 19.

Genesis: 1-4 | 5-9 | 10-14 | 15-18 | 19-22 | 23-26
27-29 | 30-32 | 33-36 | 37-39 | 40-43 | 44-46 | 47-50
Exodus: 1-4 | 5-8 | 9-11 | 12-14 | 15-18
19-22 | 23-26 | 27-30 | 31-34 | 35-40
Romans: Ch. 1 | Ch. 2 | Ch. 3 | Ch. 4 | Ch. 5 | Ch. 6 | Ch. 7 | Ch. 8 (I)
Ch. 8 (II) | Ch. 9 | Ch. 10 | Ch. 11 | Ch. 12 | Ch. 13 | Ch. 14 | Ch. 15-16
Luke: 1:1-38 | 1:39-2:40 | 2:41-3:38 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14-15 | 16-17 | 18

 
INTRODUCTION:
David:
Here, Jesus sensed the errant thoughts of the disciples concerning His rule on earth, and tried to let them down easy. “There was this guy, and he was going to receive a kingdom, but to do it he had to leave for a while and go to another country far, far, far away”¦”

 
SOMETHING YOU’D NEVER NOTICED BEFORE:
Josh:
Luke\’s telling of the parable of the ten minas is different than I realized. There were ten servants who received a mina, although only three report upon the master\’s return.

Chloe:
God likes short people better?!

Steve:
The people on the side of the road during Christ’s entry into Jerusalem were described as “the whole crowd of disciples.” I wonder how many people that included.

David:
Not this time, but another time, I noticed that this is actually the second time that Jesus cleansed the Temple. He did it at the beginning of his ministry too, the first time he ever visited Jerusalem.

 
BEST BAND NAME FROM THE PASSAGE:
Chloe: Muttering Sin
Josh: Five More; Stones Cry Out
Steve: Ten More Mina

 
DEEP THEOLOGICAL MEANING:
David:
The parable Jesus shared about His kingdom establishes a lot of doctrine on how things are supposed to happen, the attitude we can expect from the world’s inhabitants, and the judgment awaiting everyone upon His return.

Chloe:
Jesus rewarded Zacchaeus for his desperation and determination. This seems to be how Jesus works — He goes to the people who call out to Him, and the most memorable stories are also the most creative.

What comes to mind is the woman who had bled for so long (and was therefore considered unclean), yet reached out to Jesus. And the men who opened up the roof of a building to lower their paralyzed friend to Him. This desperation and determination makes me think of what we read last week in 18:7, about those who “cry out to [God] day and night” receiving justice. This is how our prayer life should be — not timid or half-hearted, but filled with boldness and resolve.

Steve:
The servant who was punished hid what he was given “in a piece of cloth,” refusing to engage his gift, given by the master, with the outside world in any way. I think this is an important lesson not only in the context of using the talents and gifts we have been given for the benefit of the Kingdom, but also as a correction to those who would read the charge to be “in the world, but not of it” as a way to avoid interaction with those outside the faith. Put your mina on deposit — in the world.

 
STORY IT REMINDS YOU OF:
David:
It’s hard to read about Zacchaeus without remembering that stupid little song. There\’s probably a sign somewhere on the entrance to heaven saying, WARNING: DO NOT ATTEMPT TO SING TO ZACCHAEUS OR CALL HIM A WEE LITTLE MAN. THIS IS GROUNDS FOR IMMEDIATE EXPULSION.

Josh:
Whenever I read the story of Zacchaeus, I picture the Jesus Walk version from a summer camp where I used to work. A friend of mine started out as Zacchaeus one summer as a member of the junior staff. Each following summer, returning staff were often given the option to return to the role they already knew, so my friend kept choosing Zacchaeus, even though he was no longer shorter than most of the “crowd.”

 
RANDOM THOUGHT:
David:
Zacchaeus offered to pay back four times any amount of taxes that he had overcharged. I wonder how many of us (including me) would be willing to pay back four times any taxes we owed, but didn’t pay?

Steve:
Will there ever come a day, before His return, when Jesus’ prophecy about Jerusalem (vv. 42-44) is not true?

 
VERSE TO REMEMBER:
David; Josh; Steve:
19:10 — “For the Son of Man has come to seek and to save that which was lost.”

Chloe:
19:39-40 — “And some of the Pharisees called to Him from the crowd, ‘Teacher, rebuke Your disciples.’ But He answered and said to them, ‘I tell you that if these should keep silent, the stones would immediately cry out.’ ”

 
PORTION YOU WOULD MOST LIKE EXPLAINED IN HEAVEN:
David:
What does it mean in v. 40 about the stones crying out?

Steve:
When did Jesus really clear the temple? At the beginning of His ministry? At the end? Both times?

 
LESSON TO TAKE AWAY:
David:
Jesus wept over Jerusalem when He considered the coming judgment. Yet I, even reading the parable that ends, “Bring here those people who refused to have me reign over them and slay them in front of me,” can hardly shed a tear for this world most days.

Josh:
The disciples who went to borrow the colt were armed with just one response to any protest: “The Lord needs it.” We have no record of the owners\’ response, so we are left to assume that this immediately satisfied them. How many of us are this willing when the Lord comes calling for our stuff, our time, our reputation, our very lives?

 
CONCLUSION:
David:
This passage sets up an all-time classic clash with the religious leaders in chapter 20.

Steve:
From this triumphant entry into the glorious city of David to a false arrest leading to a brutal murder, the next few chapters will answer the question of what Jesus would do, knowing He had only a week to live.


Comments

Leave a comment!





Comment spam protected by SpamBam